About

An Experiment in Natural Farming

All our fresh produce has been certified organic since 2008 and is currently certified by CSI. 3 orchards combine tree fruit with small fruits, herbs, flowers and native plants. We strive to find a balance of hands on and hands off – allowing nature to provide some of the plants in her own good time. A 4th orchard is slowly taking shape around the pines that nature planted. We use occasional strips of land within the orchards for mixed annual crops. We use on- farm, plant based mulches for soil and plant health as well as moisture retention. Most of the soil is under permanent ground cover. There is a mature hedgerow that spans the north side of the farm, as well as a few hedgerow “pockets” between the orchards. In 2016 we started placing more native trees, shrubs and plants around and within the orchards. We believe there are many benefits to bio-diversity including strengthening the health and productivity of the fruit producing trees and shrubs.

“Agroecology, considered by many as the foundation of sustainable agriculture,replaces chemicals with biology. It is the integrative study of the ecology of the entire food system, encompassing ecological, economic and social dimensions.It promotes agricultural practices that are adapted to local environments and stimulate beneficial biological interactions between different plants and species to build long-term fertility and soil health.” United Nations Human Rights Council Report of the Special Rapporteur on the right to food 2017.

History

The Kozowyk Family Farm

Alex and Betty Kozowyk started farming in Flamborough in 1953. Their farm was a mix of cattle, chickens, pasture, hayfields, raspberries, vegetables for the family, and flowers for beauty and the hummingbirds. A few acres of the provincially significant, Flamborough Centre Swamp was also included in the farm. These wetland woods are a rich source of biodiversity.

In 2002 Pat Kozowyk and Ernst von der Kall bought a 10 acre portion of the farm. They named it Baba Link Farm, in memory of Pat’s mother, “Baba” Betty. Baba is Ukrainian for Grandmother.

The logo for the farm is based on an Ukrainian folk art design, and is a little like the Bobolink birds that sang all summer in the pasture.

Baba Link Farm is situated where Betty grew excellent raspberries, which she grew without pesticides or chemical fertilizers. She was organic, years before organic standards came into being.

Alex Kozowyk quietly smiled, occasionally shook his head at some of Pat’s experimental ideas for the farm, but always offered a tremendous amount of support and expertise.

Both Alex and Betty are dearly missed and remembered daily on this beautiful piece of land.

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